Pre-School - 4/5 year olds

‚ÄčThis program is offered for children 4 and 5 years of age who will be attending kindergarten the next school year.  Ms. Joyce, the lead teacher of the 4 years olds, has been with Marymount Child Care Center since 1992. Ms. Audrey, the co-lead teacher, has been with Marymount Child Care Center since 1998.  A lesson plan is prepared weekly to include the 6 content areas of: literacy, math, science, social studies, the arts and technology.  When preparing the lesson plans, the teachers of Marymount Child Care Center incorporate the Ohio's Early Learning and Development Standards in All Essential Domains of School Readiness.  The teachers believe in appropriately setting up their teaching regime to maintain interest in classroom activities and foster an optimum learning environment. The teachers establish schedules and routines, organize choice times and small and large group times to create a classroom community where children learn how to get along with others and solve problems logically.

Developmental Domains

English Language Arts

  • Identify matching sounds and recongnize rhymes in familar stories, poems, songs and words (e.g., cat/hat, dog/frog).

  • Hear sounds in words by isolating the syllables of a word using snapping, clapping or rhythmic movement (e.g., cat, ap-ple).

  • Differentiate between sounds that are the same and different (e.g., environmental sound, animal sounds, phonemes)

  • Recognize when words share phonemes (sounds) and repeat the common phoneme (e.g., /b/ as in Bob, ball, baby; /t/ as in Matt, kite, boat).

  • Indentify own name in print.

  • Recognize and name some upper and lower case letter in addition to those in first name.

  • Recognize that words are made up of letters (e.g., c-a-t).

  • Recognize and "read" familiar words or environmental print (e.g., McDonalds, Bob Evans).

  • Demonstrate an understanding of reading fluency by use of phrasing, intonation and expression in shared reading (e.g., Brown Bear, Brown Bear).

  • Understand the meaning of new words from context of conversations, the use of pictures that accompany text or the use of concrete objects.

  • Recognize and demonstrate an understanding of environmental print (e.g., STOP on a stop sign).

  • Name items in common categories (e.g., animals, food, clothing, transportation, etc.).

  • Demonstrate or orally communicate position and directional words (e.g., inside, outside, in front of, behind).

  • Determine the meaning of unkown words with assistance or cues from an adult (e.g., providing a frame of reference, context or comparison).

  • Understand that print has meaning by demonstrating the functions of print through play activities (e.g.,  orders from a menu in pretend play).

  • Hold books right side up, know that people read pages from front to back, top to bottom and read words from left to right.

  • Begin to distinguish print from pictures.

  • Begin to visualize, represent, and sequence an understanding of text through a variety of media and play.

  • Predict what might happen next during reading of text.

  • Connect information or ideas in text to prior knowledge and experience (e.g., "I have a new puppy at home too.").

  • Answer literal questions to demonstrate comprehension of orally read age-appropriate texts.

  • Respond to oral reading by commenting or questioning (e.g., "That would taste yucky.").

  • Use pictures and illustrations to aid comprehension (e.g., talks about a picture when sharing a story in a book).

  • Retell information from informational text.

  • Gain text information from pictures, photos, simple charts and labels.

  • Follow simple directions.

  • Retell or re-enact events from a story through a variety of media and play events (e.g., dramatize a favorite story).

  • Begin to demonstrate an understanding of the differences between fantasy and reality (e.g., talking flowers and animals).

  • Generate ideas for a story or shared writing with assistance.

  • Choose a topic for writing related to shared or personal experience.

  • Begin to determine purpose for writing (e.g., writing invitations to a birthday party).

  • Generate related ideas with assistance.

  • Dictate or produce "writing" to express thoughts.

  • Repeat message conveyed through dictation or "writing" (e.g., retell what is written).

  • Begin to use resources (e.g., labels, books, adults, word walls, computer, etc.) to convey meaning.

  • Display or share writing samples, illustrations and dictated stories with others.

  • Dictate stories or produce simple stories using pictures, mock letters or words.

  • Name objects and label with assistance from adult cues (e.g., table, door).

  • Dictate words or produce writing approximations for a variety of purposes (e.g., menus in dramatic play, note to friend).

  • Print letters of own name and other meaningful words with assistance using mock letters and/or conventional print.

  • Begin to demonstrate letter formation in "writing".

  • Scribble familiar words with mock letters and some actual letters (e.g., love, Mom, child's name).

  • Indicate an awareness of letters that cluster as words, words in phrases or sentences by use of spacing, symbols or marks.

  • Ask questions about experiences, areas of interest, pictures, letters, words, logos or icons (e.g. EXIT on a sign in the store).

  • Use a variety of resources to gather informtion with assistance (e.g., pictionary, informational picture books).

  • Share findings of information through retelling, media and play (e.g., draw a picture of the desert).

  • Attend to speakers, stories, poems and songs.

  • Connect information and events to personal experiences by sharing or commenting.

  • Follow simple oral directions.

  • Speak clearly and understandably to express ideas, feelings and needs.

  • Initiate and sustain a conversation through turn taking.

Mathematics

  • Count to 10 in the context of daily activities and play (e.g., number songs).

  • Touch objects and say the number names when counting in the context of daily activities and play (e.g., cookies on a plate, steps on a set of stairs).

  • Demonstrate one-to-one correspondence when counting objects (e.g., give one cookie to each child in group).

  • Determine "how many" in sets of 5 or fewer objects.

  • Begins to write numerical representations (e.g., scribbles, reversals) or numerals in meaningful context (e.g., play situations).

  • Begins to identify and name numeral 0-9.

  • Compare and order whole numbers up to 5.

  • Begin to indentify and use the language of units of time (e.g., day, night, week or yesterday, today, tomorrow).

  • Recognize that various devices measure time (e.g., clock, timer, calendar).

  • Sequence or order events in the context of daily activities and play (e.g., wash your hands before and after snack, who's next for the computer).

  • Begin to use terms to compare the attributes of objects (e.g., bigger, smaller, lighter, heavier, taller, shroter, more and less).

  • Match identical two- and three-dimensional objects found in the environment in play situations (e.g., 2 squares of same size, 2 stop signs).

  • Demonstrate and begin to use the language of the relative position of objects in the environment and play situations (e.g., up, down, over, under, top, bottom, inside, outside, in front, behind, between, next to, right side up and upside down).

  • Gather, sort and compare objects by similarities and differences in the context of daily activities and play (e.g., leaves, nuts, socks).

  • Place information or objects in a floor or table graph, according to one attribute (e.g., size, color, shape or quantity).

  • Select the category or categories that have the most or fewest objects in a floor or table graph (e.g., favorite ice cream).

Science

  • Begin to use terms such as night and day, sun and moon to describe personal observations.

  • Observe and represent the pattern of day and night through play, art materials or conversation.

  • Observe, explore and compare changes that animals and plants contribute to in their surroundings (e.g., humans building roads and houses, holes left by worms or squirrels).

  • Explore and compare changes in the environment over time (e.g., soil erosion, fossils, outdoor temperature).

  • Observe and use language or drawings to describe changes in the weather (e.g., sunny to cloudy day).

  • Identify common needs (e.g., food, air, water) of familiar living things.

  • Begin to differentiate between real and pretend through stories, illustrations, play and other media (e.g., talking flowers or animals).

  • Observe and begin to recognize the ways that environments support life by meeting the unique needs of each organism (e.g., plant/soil, birds/air, fish/water).

  • Match familar adult family members, plants and animals with their young (e.g., horse.colt, cow/calf).

  • Recognize physical differences amount the same class of people, plants or animals (e.g., dogs come in many sizes and colors).

  • Exlpore and identify parts and wholes of familiar objects (e.g., books, toys, furniture).

  • Explore and compare materials that provide many different sensory experiences (e.g., sand, water, wood).

  • Sort familiar objects by one or more property (e.g., size, shape, function).

  • Demonstrate understanding of motion related words (e.g., up, down, fast, slow, rolling, jumping, backward, forward).

  • Explore ways of moving objects in different ways (e.g., pushing, pulling, kicking, rolling, throwing, dropping).

  • Explore musical instruments and objects and manipulate one's own voice to recognize the changes in quality of sound (e.g., talks about loud, soft, high, low, fast, slow).

  • Identify the intended purpose of familiar tools (e.g., scissors, hammer, paintbrush, cookie cutter).

  • Explore new uses for familiar materials through play, art or drama (e.g., paper towel rolls as kazoos, pan for a hat).

  • Demonstrate the safe use of tools, such as scissors, hammers, writing utensils, with adult guidance.

  • Ask questions about objects, organisms and events in their environment during shared stories, conversations and play (e.g., ask about how worms eat).

  • Predict what will happen next based on previous experiences (e.g., when a glass falls off the table and hits the tile floor, it most likey will break).

  • Record or represent and communicate observations and finding through a variety of methods (e.g., pictures, words, graphs, dramatizations) with assistance.

  • Offer ideas and explanations (through drawings, emergent writing, conversation, movement) of objects, organisms and phenomena, which may be correct or incorrect.

  • Recognize the difference between helpful and harmful actions toward living things (e.g., watering or not watering plants).

  • Participate in simple, spontaneous scientific explorations with others (e.g. digging to the bottom of the sandbox, testing materials that sink or float).

Social Studies

  • Begin to use the language or time (e.g., day, night, yesterday, today, tomorrow).

  • Label days by function (e.g., school day, stay at home day, swim day, field trip day).

  • Begin to use or respond to the language of time such as next, before, soon, after, now and later as related to daily schedules and routines.

  • Share episodes of personal history from birth to present through personal memorabilia or connected to stories.

  • Arrange sequences of personal and shared events through pictures, growth charts and other media.

  • Share personal family stories and traditions (e.g., photo album put together by family members).

  • Develop a sense of belonging to different groups (e.g., family, group of friends, preschool class, boys or girls).

  • Demonstrate awareness of different cultures through exploration of family customs and traditions (e.g., exploration of music, food, games, languages, dress).

  • Demonstrate and use terms related to location, direction and distance (e.g., up, down, over, under, front, back, here, there).

  • Demonstrate the ways that streets and buildings can be identified by symbols, such as letters, numbers or logos (e.g., street signs, addresses).

  • Demonstrate how maps can be useful to finding places (e.g., streets, homes, places to visit).

  • Navigate within familiar environments, such as home, neighborhood or school, under supervision.

  • Describe and represent the inside and outside of familiar environments such as home and school (e.g., playground).

  • Recognize and name the immediate surroundings of home/school (e.g., homes, buildings, bridges, hills, woods, lakes) following supervised explorations.

  • Explore the ways we use natural resources found in our environment (e.g., water to drink, dirt to plant).

  • Recognize that people have many wants within the context of family and classroom.

  • Understand how sharing classroom materials will meet everyone's wants (e.g., turn taking at the water table, distrubuting crayons equitably).

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of production, distrubution and consumption through play (e.g., food purchased from the store and cooked at home).

  • Obtain things they want (e.g., goods and services) in socially acceptable ways (e.g., verbalizing, turn taking).

  • Interact with and respond to guidance and assistance in socially accepted ways from familiar adults at school and home (e.g., responds to redirection, invites others to play).

  • Interact with familiar and appropriate adults for assistance, when needed (e.g., family member, teacher, police, firefighter).

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the specific roles and responsibilities within a group (e.g., picking up own toys).

  • Recognize the flag of the United States as a symbol of our government.

  • Participate in creating and following classroom rules and routines.

  • Demonstrate cooperative behaviors, such as helping, turn taking, sharing, comforting, and compromising.

  • Engage in problem-solving behavior with diminishing support from adults (e.g., negotiating roles in play, turn taking).

  • Demonstrate increasing ability to make independent choices and follow through on plans (e.g., putting toys away, moving from activity to activity).

  • Demonstate awareness of the outcomes of one's own choices (e.g., picking up toys helps create a safe environment).

  • Gain information through participation in experiences with objects, media, books and engaging in conversations with peers.

  • Begin to make predictions (e.g., guess whether other countries around the world celebrate birthdays).

  • Represent ideas through multiple forms of language and expression (e.g., drawing, dramatic play, conversation, art media, music, movement, energent writing).

 

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